Wolf Spider – Combined Classroom / Homework task with Mr Andrew’s Grade

5/6A students can use this post to comment on as well. You can comment on your thoughts about wolf spiders or you may be able to complete an OWI for this video.

Watch the video and come up with 3 facts that you have learnt about wolf spiders and ask 3 questions about wolf spiders for further research.

Make sure you revise and edit your work prior to posting.

View original post

31 thoughts on “Wolf Spider – Combined Classroom / Homework task with Mr Andrew’s Grade

  1. My thoughts about wolf spiders are that they scary. They are very hairy creatures. The hair gives them grip to climb up walls. If you look very closely, you’ll see very tiny hairs, sticking out. The hairs are sticky as well. Their fangs help suck in the venom, the venom kills them first, so then the prey can’t escape. then soon the wolf spiders take it to their homes and eventually eat it. Sometimes if wolf spiders see a dangerous predator, their fast ability helps them to sprint away, or back into their holes.

    1. Great comment Jay. It is good to see that you are using your knowledge about what you learned in I.C.T with Mr Prices grade.

    2. Well done Jay, what you have written about this filthy creature is fabulous! It is good tosee that you are always thinking really hard. Great job and well done.

  2. EWWWWWWW I HATE SPIDERS!!!!!! 😦
    Mr Andrews, WHY WOULD YOU PUT SOMETHING UP LIKE THIS?????
    No serious, TELL ME!

  3. There are many species of Wolf Spider, ranging in size. Their body colours are typically drab, with most having variegated patterns in brown and yellow, grey, black and white; some inland species are a bright salmon pink below. Often the patterns include radiating lines on the carapace (front of the body) and scroll-like patterns on the abdomen. The spider’s underside is light grey, cream or black, sometimes salmon pink, often with black or white markings superimposed. The sides of their jaws may have a small raised orange spot or ‘boss’. Wolf spiders have eight eyes in three rows (4,2,2), with the four smaller eyes in front and the four largest arranged in a square on top of the high and convex head.
    Size range
    1 cm – 8 cm
    Habitat
    Wolf Spiders are found in habitats ranging from dry inland shrub lands and woodlands to wet coastal forests and alpine meadows
    According to the Queensland Museum, two Wolf spider species are known to be predators of cane toads. Lycosa lapidosa will take small toads and frogs while L. obscuroides has been noted biting and killing a large toad within one hour.
    Feeding Habits
    arthropod-feeder, carnivorous, insectivorous, predator
    Most Wolf Spiders are wanderers but some build burrows, either open or with a trapdoor, while others may make temporary retreats in vegetation. Arid zone species build turrets to deflect floodwaters during rainy periods, while others use pebbles to plug their burrows. In woodlands, twigs may be used to form a palisade around the top of the burrow. Burrows of the Grey Wolf Spider have a circular trap door that is often left open when the spider is out hunting.The shape and materials used to form burrows and trapdoors may help to distinguish similar-looking species. The female constructs an egg sac of white papery silk, shaped like a ball with an obvious circular seam, which she then carries around attached with strong silk to her spinnerets. When the spiderlings hatch, they are carried around on the female’s back until they are ready to disperse by ballooning or on the ground. Such a high degree of parental care is relatively unusual among spiders.
    Mating takes place outside the female’s burrow at night. Some adult male Wolf Spiders of smaller-sized species are known to disperse by air in order to find mates. The male is attracted by scent markings left by the female, often associated with her drag-line silk. Males perform a courtship ritual prior to mating, often involving complex leg and palp signalling to the female.
    Symptoms of a Wolf spider bite are usually minor, restricted to local pain or itchiness. Less commonly, symptoms can include swelling, prolonged pain, dizziness, rapid pulse and nausea.

    From this info, I think that Wolf Spiders are DEADLY. 🙂

    1. Heidie, very, very descriptive comment, lots of emotive words, correct spelling, punctuation, emotive words and lots more.
      Mr Andrew put that up because we were doing this with our buddies today (3/4P).

      1. I know Heidie, I don’t like them ethier but I had to do it (unfortunantly.) 🙂

    2. Heidie, that’s a very descriptive comment, you put lots of emotive words and punctuation was very good that peace is sow amazingly wonderful.

  4. Mr Andrew, I am doing 3 things I learned and 3 things I want to know.
    1. The wolf spider doesn’t need to spin a web because the have lighting fast reflex’s and speed.
    2. Wolf spiders use their body’s to make the tunnel bigger.
    3. Wolf spiders can feel vibrations through their feet to tell were their prey is.

    1. What is the lifespan of a wolf spider?
    2. How many eggs can wolf spiders lay in a lifetime?
    3. How big can wolf spiders grow?

  5. This is some of the information that i researched after watching this video:
    Wolf spiders can be found in a wide range of habitats both coastal and inland. These include forests, rainforests, meadows, and suburban gardens. Some build burrows which can be left open or have a trapdoor. Wolf spiders are capable of defensive bites. Some of the symptoms of their venomous bite are swelling, mild pain and itchiness. Because they depend on camouflage for protection, they do not have the flashy appearance of some other kinds of spiders. They have eight eyes arranged in three rows. The bottom row consists of four small eyes, the middle row has two very large eyes. They depend on their excellent eyesight to hunt and catch their pray. Many Wolf Spiders have wide distributions, especially across inland regions. This distribution is aided by their ability to disperse aerially as spiderlings or small juveniles over large distances. Many also have very specific microhabitat preferences such as stream-side gravel beds, montane herb-fields or coastal sand-dunes. According to the Queensland Museum, two Wolf spider species are known to be predators of cane toads. Lycosa lapidosa will take small toads and frogs while L. obscuroides has been noted biting and killing a large toad within one hour. Most Wolf Spiders are wanderers but some build burrows, either open or with a trapdoor, while others may make temporary retreats in vegetation. Arid zone species build turrets to deflect floodwaters during rainy periods, while others use pebbles to plug their burrows. In woodlands, twigs may be used to form a palisade around the top of the burrow. Burrows of the Grey Wolf Spider (Lycosa simsoni) have a circular trap door that is often left open when the spider is out hunting.The shape and materials used to form burrows and trapdoors may help to distinguish similar-looking species. The female constructs an egg sac of white papery silk, shaped like a ball with an obvious circular seam, which she then carries around attached with strong silk to her spinnerets. When the spiderlings hatch, they are carried around on the female’s back until they are ready to disperse by ballooning or on the ground. Such a high degree of parental care is relatively unusual among spiders. Mating takes place outside the female’s burrow at night. Some adult male Wolf Spiders of smaller-sized species are known to disperse by air in order to find mates. The male is attracted by scent markings left by the female, often associated with her drag-line silk. Males perform a courtship ritual prior to mating, often involving complex leg and palp signalling to the female.
    Family:Lycosidae
    Superfamily:Lycosoidea
    Order:Araneae
    Class:Arachnida
    Phylum:Arthropoda
    Kingdom:Animalia
    There are many species of Wolf Spider, ranging in size. Their body colours are typically drab, with most having variegated patterns in brown and yellow, grey, black and white; some inland species are a bright salmon pink below. Often the patterns include radiating lines on the carapace (front of the body) and scroll-like patterns on the abdomen. The spider’s underside is light grey, cream or black, sometimes salmon pink, often with black or white markings superimposed. The sides of their jaws may have a small raised orange spot or ‘boss’. Wolf spiders have eight eyes in three rows (4,2,2), with the four smaller eyes in front and the four largest arranged in a square on top of the high and convex head. Two of the commonest Australian species are Lycosa godeffroyi and L. leuckartii, with a wide range in the temperate parts of the continent. Wolf Spiders are found throughout Australia. They are robust, agile hunters that live on the ground in leaf litter or burrows. They are often found in lawns and gardens. The Wolf Spider is found throughout Australia, living in small burrows or under leaves, bark, or other debris. They are hardy spiders, and live under almost any conditions. Wolf Spiders can be found in suburban gardens to desolate inland regions. They are able to dig burrows up to 30 cms deep by using their jaws. Some species create a trap door on their burrow, and others are known to cover the entrance with a pebble. There are many species of the Wolf Spider. The two most common species to be found in Australia are Lycosa godeffroyi and Lycosa leuckartii. These spiders obtained the label ‘wolf’ as they are known to stalk their prey such as a wild canine would. They have eight eyes in a 2-2-4 formation (see photo), two at the back, two at the centre and four in front. The Wolf Spider feeds on other insects such as crickets, lizards and etcetera. It is also known to take down larger prey such as mice, small birds and even cane toads.
    Apart from their scary appearance, Wolf Spiders are not aggressive arachnids. If disturbed however, the wolf spider may defend itself by biting. There have been no reported deaths from the Wolf Spider, and no antivenin is required after a bite. However, if a human is bitten by a Wolf Spider, medical advice should be sought. Wolf Spiders can cause necrosis (rotting of the skin). The venom of a Wolf Spider is powerful enough to kill a fully grown dog within a few hours. The venom of a wolf spider is massive threat to everyone and anything/one.

    1. Carrisa, that is an outstanding comment about wolf spiders. You have an extreme amount of information about wolf spiders, lots of descriptive and emotive words. Just outstanding. 50 out of 10. Awesome job.

  6. WOLF SPIDERS ARE REALLY DEADLY. WHENEVER I GO TO THIS POST AND IT COMES UP WITH THE VIDEO I HAVE A HEART ATTACK. If I have it again, The sirens of the ambulance will come past your door.
    Any way, Wolf spiders are very detective. They are camouflaging spiders so they can snatch their pray in the unexpected. 🙂

  7. All of that is very true Heidie, (even properly you will have a heart attack:))they do camouflage to catch they prey undetected. They are aware were their prey is. Great comment and information about wolf spiders. Well done.

  8. WOLF SPIDER

    I found the Wolf spider really scary because it has really big fangs and it looks really disgusting by the look of it and it had four eyes and it was really frightening because it kept on looking really weirdly at the other animals and it looks really terrifying. The wolf spider was looking at other animals really freaky and it kept on walking inside the hole and it also kept on coming outside of the hole for a long time.

    The spider has four looking eyes and the scariest thing about the wold spider is how the spider can feel the vibration of the animals from the leg hairs and that it can feel an animal coming near the burrow. The female wolf spider uses it’s fangs to make the burrow. The wolf spider doesn’t need to spin a web because they have lighting fast reflex and speed. The wolf spider terrifies me because it doesn’t look like a natural spider and it looks really venomous.

    I wonder what a wolf spider can do to a human if a person touched it because in the video it doesn’t talk about how venomous the spider is to people, it only talks about the spider itself.
    I wonder if the spider is half wolf because of the teeth and the fangs look really freaky on a spider because it doesn’t look natural and it looks like a wolf and a spider made a family but that would be really unnatural because I have never seen anything like this before.
    I wonder why the spider looks really freaky and why it has really huge fangs and I also wonder how the wolf spider can feel vibrations through its leg hairs because the animals are really quiet and they don’t take really big steps when they get past the wolf spider.

    I wish the wolf spider didn’t exist because I don’t like spiders because they are really terrifying and I don’t like them because they are really scary and I think they are really unsafe to be near because they move around a lot and they can be really sneaky because I have an experience because once I was just sitting on the ground and a spider climbed up my arm and I was just freaking out so then I stared to dislike spider for climbing up my arm.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s